10 things you should never say to those dealing with chronic pain

89% of people with chronic pain have avoided discussing it with family and friends

Leitrim Observer Reporter

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Leitrim Observer Reporter

10 things you should never say to those dealing with chronic pain

Research announced today by the ‘mypainfeelslike…’ campaign found that 89% of people living with chronic pain have avoided discussing it with family and friends so as not to bore them or seem annoying.1 26% admitted to regularly avoiding talking about their pain with loved ones.

The ‘mypainfeelslike...’ campaign has compiled a list of 10 things NOT to say to someone with chronic pain so they feel empowered to talk about it and are encouraged to seek help and talk to their doctor.

A lack of belief around the severity of their pain and a lack of understanding of its impact are daily issues faced by people living with chronic pain. According to a European survey, around 30% of people living with chronic pain feel that no one believes how much pain they are experiencing.  About one in four felt that colleagues, employers and doctors were unsympathetic to their pain or did not think it was a problem.

‘10 things NOT to say to someone with chronic pain’ 

1.       But you look so well

2.       Do you still have pain?

3.       You depend too much on your medication

4.       It’s all in your head

5.       Have you seen a psychiatrist?

6.       It’s just a matter of time

7.       You should learn to live with it

8.       You should try and get out more

9.       You should feel better by now

10.      Everyone has pain

“Living with persistent pain can severely impact someone’s life. It is an invisible illness that compromises both quality of life and emotional health”, said Orla Spencer, Clinical Psychologist, Tallaght Hospital, Dublin. “Many people can feel isolated with their pain and think that others do not understand the impact it has on their life. They often struggle to explain the effect is having on their lives. While intentions are good, comments like the ones listed can be hurtful and inappropriate. Moreover, they can often silence someone at a time when they need support from the people around them to be empowered to find new ways to cope with their pain. I encourage people to adopt a non-judgemental approach to someone with pain ”.

For the full story see mypainfeelslike.ie