Manor links to new Canadian Police Chief

The recently appointed new Deputy Chief of the Canadian capital city of Ottawa’s Police Service Ed Keeley has strong connections with the Manorhamilton area.

The recently appointed new Deputy Chief of the Canadian capital city of Ottawa’s Police Service Ed Keeley has strong connections with the Manorhamilton area.

His late grandmother was Brigid McGuiness was from Faughery Mullies while Faughery resident Sarah Connolly is a first cousin of Ed’s mother, who was born in Dublin.

Reporting on how Ed found out about his new appointment the local “Ottawa Citizen” newspaper noted “Ed Keeley was standing in a corridor at City Hall on Monday evening, just minutes after finding out he’d been promoted to deputy chief of the Ottawa police.

“The competition for the deputy chief position was so close that the two shortlisted candidates – Keeley and Supt. Jill Skinner – were called back in front of the Police Services Board for a second interview on Monday afternoon.

“Keeley is a 27-year veteran, who served 14 years with the Ontario Provincial Police before joining the Ottawa Police Service. Most recently, he was serving as executive officer to Bordeleau.

“Like many senior officers in recent years, largely due to the influence of former chief and Senator Vern White, Keeley was encouraged to enrol in a university programme. Last year, he graduated with a bachelor’s degree in policing studies after a distance learning program with Charles Sturt University in Australia.

“Bordeleau, after congratulating Keeley, said his new deputy’s biggest strength is his ability to connect with people, both inside and outside the organisation and his credibility with the members.

“His people skills are great,” he said. “He can relate to everybody and he listens and he understands and he’s very compassionate. Keeley said he wants to communicate to the public about the quality of the city’s police officers.

‘I’ve always been proud of my relationship with the members,’ Keeley said. ‘I know the tremendous work that they do every day.’

“He’ll need that attitude to get through whatever scandals lie ahead – with 2,000 members, some instances of wrongdoing are inevitable.

“Keeley said that in such cases, he’ll stress the need to be fair and investigate with due process, while also being transparent with the public.

‘I think the members would expect that. Members would want us to be operating as professionally as possible. That’s how they conduct their business on a day-to-day basis,’ Keeley said.

“Keeley said that in his new role he will be looking to help carry out the three pillars of Bordeleau’s vision: the idea that ‘everyone matters, financial sustainability and community engagement.’

“El-Chantiry, who said the contract will probably be a five-year deal, said Keeley’s desire to support the chief is what clinched him for the job.

“Asked what Keeley’s best answer was during the interview, El-Chantiry said: ‘Best answer (was), I’m committed to support the chief on his three pillars, I’m there to support the chief because now we have a chief with a vision and I want to be part of that team. He made a compelling case, how he’d support the chief.’

“Anne Keeley, the wife of the new deputy, came to City Hall to be there for the announcement – although she didn’t know whether it would be good news for her husband or not.”

‘It could have gone either way,’ she said. “Mrs. Keeley, who went through the years of nervous nights with her husband on patrol, was thrilled for him.

‘A big part of Ed is his being a police officer and that attracted me to him,’ she said. ‘His morals, his ethics, everything that he stands for’ Anne Keeley remarked were other reasons why she was attracted to her husband according to the “Ottawa Citizen.”