Connacht residents feeling less secure

A new report from eircom PhoneWatch has revealed that Connacht feels less secure than it did a year ago with as many as four in 10 Connacht householders admitting they felt significantly concerned.

A new report from eircom PhoneWatch has revealed that Connacht feels less secure than it did a year ago with as many as four in 10 Connacht householders admitting they felt significantly concerned.

This sense of concern is further reinforced by the finding that when it came to significant life events one in five Irish people rated burglary’s impact in the same league as losing their job or having enough money to pay monthly bills.

The report which measures the security outlook of Irish people and the actions it triggers in the home and the community reveals that the feeling of vulnerability was also found to be indiscriminate as it impacts men and women or those with high and low incomes equally.

The eircom PhoneWatch Irish Security Attitude Index also reveals this feeling of insecurity triggers a reaction; 43% of those surveyed (or 600,000 homes nationwide) reported doing something about their home security. The report also revealed that 92% of people nationwide who reported feeling more secure have security features within their home. The heightened feeling of uncertainty has impacted the behaviour of Irish people across the board – 74% of Connacht respondents admitted they sleep with their mobile phone next to their bed, while a fifth sleep with a hurley under their beds. The report also found that over four in ten homes nationwide who already have a security feature have installed another in the last 12 months. Most popular security features in Connacht range from additional door and window locks (34%), security lights (34%) and unmonitored alarms (15%). Connacht people also believe that dogs and community are as effective deterrents to burglary as leaving the lights or radio on. Plus the report revealed that although more people are now turning the alarm on, only a small number (13%) use it when they are in the house with others and 25% when they are in the home alone. These outcomes are surprising given the personal risks associated with burglary as a crime.