1 in 5 in region uncomfortable with mental health issues

This is according to a nationwide study undertaken by Behaviour & Attitudes for the Irish Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (IACP). The study was carried out in order to better understand the value that Irish people attach to availing of counselling or psychotherapy services. It also shows that 1 in 7 (14%) Connaught adults tell no-one about their personal problems and difficulties.

This is according to a nationwide study undertaken by Behaviour & Attitudes for the Irish Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (IACP). The study was carried out in order to better understand the value that Irish people attach to availing of counselling or psychotherapy services. It also shows that 1 in 7 (14%) Connaught adults tell no-one about their personal problems and difficulties.

This is according to a nationwide study undertaken by Behaviour & Attitudes for the Irish Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (IACP). The study was carried out in order to better understand the value that Irish people attach to availing of counselling or psychotherapy services. It also shows that 1 in 7 (14%) Connaught adults tell no-one about their personal problems and difficulties.

“Talking to a professional counsellor or psychotherapist can be of great support in times of crisis or change. There’s no reason to be embarrassed. The therapeutic process can help alleviate difficulties for people who are experiencing problems in areas such as relationships, addictions, illness or stress” said Geraldine Gilroy, Sligo-based counsellor and Chairperson of the IACP North West Committee.

The research results show that adults in Connaught are less likely to attend a counsellor and psychotherapist than other parts of the country. Only one in five (20%) of people in Connaught have ever attended counselling or psychotherapy, compared to almost one in three people in Dublin (28%) and Leinster (29%). The survey also highlights the fact that over-65s are less likely to talk about their problems.

One in four (23%) over-65s in Ireland keep their personal problems and difficulties to themselves. This figure is nearly double the rate for the overall adult population (13%).

While 70% of people said they would discuss problems with a friend or family member, only one in two (49%) over-65s would share their problems.

A quarter (25%) of Irish people have ever attended counselling or psychotherapy, but only one in seven (14%) of over-65s have attended.

Eamon Timmins, Head of Advocacy & Communications at Age Action Ireland, welcomed the IACP findings. “Anxiety and stress experienced among older people may be caused by uncertainty over the future, stress due to enforced retirement, loss because of bereavement. The third stage in life can be the most enjoyable and rewarding. So please, if you’re going through a rough patch, let someone know. Talk to a relative, friend, GP, nurse or counsellor. Don’t go though it alone”, he said.