Tamboran deny any purchase rumours

Rumours that one of the prospecting frack companies in the area had begun purchasing areas of land have been denied by the company.

Rumours that one of the prospecting frack companies in the area had begun purchasing areas of land have been denied by the company.

Word had been circulating locally that Tamboran Resources, one of the companies with an exploration licence in the area were involved in the purchasing of a quarry just outside Belcoo, Co Fermanagh. A member of the public informed the paper of the rumour last week which has been causing some concern for locals along the border.

A spokesperson for Tamboran Resources denied that the gas company are involved in the purchase of this quarry outside Belcoo, they informed the Leitrim Observer that they have not been involved in the purchase of any property in the area.

The spokesperson for Tamboran Resources, who are seeking a full fracking licence from the Irish Government for Leitrim and Fermanagh said the company are still in the “research stage.”

The company are “advancing” with this research and are optimistic that they will hit their scheduled timeline, as set out last year. Tamboran Resources have an exploration licence up until February 28, 2013 they are then expected to apply for a fracking licence.

Fracking was one of the topics covered at the Euroscience Open Forum in Dublin last week.

Prof Zoe Shipton one of the authors of the fracking report in the UK said unconventional gas drilling was not altogether different from conventional gas drilling. Prof Shipton believed it was theoretically possible for fractured shale gas to seep into aquifers, but the amounts involved would be very small because the fissures in the rock are narrower than a grain of sand.

A small protest by anti-fracking campaigners took place outside the Convention Centre Dublin.

Ivan Pearson, a scientific officer in the European Commission’s energy security research unit said the European Commission was putting forward a comprehensive report on the environmental and climate aspects of fracking.

He warned that without unconventional gas, the percentage of Europe’s energy needs met by imported fuel would rise from 50% to 70%.

Following the publication of a preliminary background research study in to the environmental aspect of fracking, the EPA in Ireland has commissioned a much more expensive research project into this system of gas extraction.

A working group, involving representatives from the Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources and the EPA is currently developing a specification for this study and it is intended that the findings would inform the consideration of any future application for an exploration licence.