Shortening days good for anglers

Splendid isolation - the joys of angling
It is hard to accept that the longest day has come and gone again for another year. It always seems so incredibly unfair that these coming six months shall seem to go by at one third the speed. The Last Cast - Jarlaith Gallagher

It is hard to accept that the longest day has come and gone again for another year. It always seems so incredibly unfair that these coming six months shall seem to go by at one third the speed.

The Last Cast - Jarlaith Gallagher

I think I can say that for most of us, the 21st of June can be thought of as the real beginning of our supposed summer. The exams are nearly all over, the kids are more visible and the championship has begun in earnest. It is bright till eleven or twelve and in quite a few households laundry baskets, garments await to be cleansed that bear the optimistic essence of a recent evening barbeque.

Unfortunately the reality is, that the days are beginning to shorten. Boo hiss! I say, but in other ways the arrival of the summer solstice and the gradual change in light availability can have some very positive benefits for the fly fisher. This spells good news for the angler for a number of reasons. The first being, that as light begins to decrease, strikes a long held genetic alarm off in both fish and in their feeding behavior. The onset of shorter days reinforces the prospect of reproduction, which requires tiptop condition. It is no coincidence that June, July and August are also the most productive months for fly life both aquatic and terrestrial.

The explosion of life from the midge (buzzer/chironomidae), the Caenis (Anglers curse) and other invertebrates give the trout a very healthy choice of muscle building material! This variety has caused many an angler great frustration when choosing a fly to present. My own answer is to present a fly that gives the trout more bang for its worth, in which I mean, a fly that represents more energy value. Two fly’s that fit this requirement are the “Daddylonglegs” (Tipulidae) in daylight and as evening falls the sedge (Trichoptera). For the next two months these two fly patterns in both dry and wet styles shall be the order of the cast I shall prepare. The flies are most commonly fished “dry”, either singly or in teams of two, positioned four to six feet apart. Whilst dry flies are normally fished static, sedge patterns such as the “Murrough”, “Grey Flag” and “Small Brown Sedge” are best retrieved with short pulls which represent the characteristic skittering motion of the natural sedge across the water surface. The Green Peter and Red-Assed Peter are classic all-rounders, fished equally well “wet” or “dry”. They can be fished in any position on the cast, right through to the end of the season. Why not give them a try and if you have any success drop me a line, no pun intended!

Family Fun Day: Sunday July 7, is a day you must make time for. The annual Family Fun Day hosted by RSDAC with the most generous support of all local businesses and club members shall take place on the shores of Lough Rinn. The proceedings begin at noon and the itinerary is a very attractive one indeed. The Garda Band shall once again impress with their wide and varied eclectic tunes. Also on the bill are local singers, pig on a spit, barbeque, Irish dancing, children’s dance, cart rides with “Shergar” the donkey and boat trips around the lake. I reckon it’s the place to be so see you there!

Until next time, keep it lit and beir bua!