Cures, drinking, fights and
quarrels at
Holy Wells

An interesting photo of Bernie Keane from Drumshanbo working in the fields on a moving/threshing machine.
Did you visit a local Holy Well on February 1, St Brigid’s Day? For generations wells were a vital part of the local community.

Did you visit a local Holy Well on February 1, St Brigid’s Day? For generations wells were a vital part of the local community.

Holy Wells

There are two holy wells in this district. One is in the townland of Mullaghduff and the other is in Killargue. The people visit the holy well in Killargue on August 15.

About 60 years ago, the people used to visit the holy well in Mullaghduff. At these whiskey and many other things were sold. Then the people began to drink and enjoy themselves instead of praying. They also begun to fight. The priest who was living in Killargue at that time prevented them from going to it. The name of this Well was Tobar Brighde. Thomas Cresswell who owned the well land in which Tobar Brighde was situated closed the well. When he arose the next morning the well was reopened. His successors never touched the well again.

The well in Killargue is called Tobar Mhuire. In the Penal Times a bishop came to it dressed as a piper and administered the sacrament of confirmation to many children. About 32 years ago there was a mission in Killargue. One evening the missioners with hundreds of people marched from the chapel to the Holy Well. The missioners carried the Blessed Sacrament and blessed the Holy Well.

Some invalids drink the water, other bathe their feet in the stream, while many rub the water to an affected spot.

Relics, offerings and money are left behind at the well.

Story collected from Scoil Cill Fhearga, Killenummery by Patrick Lyond, Killargue

The Spa Well

About 100 years ago there existed one of the finest wells in Ireland about a mile from Dromahair. This well was situated in the ditch between two men’s lands. This well was the cause of many bitter quarrels and abuse as each claimed the well. Law proceedings were instituted to determine the ownership of the well. On the morning on which the court was to decide this long dispute it was found that the well had dried completely up and that it had burst out on the embankment of the railway which apparently belongs to no one. This is one of the finest sulphur wells in the West of Ireland.

Story collected from Scoil Drumlease by Patricia McGoldrick, Dromahair.