“It’s like a horror show and we’re the stars” says McGivern family

“It’s like a horror show and we’re the stars,” admitted Joe McGivern, father of brave transplant waiting list patient, Meadhbh McGivern after the findings of two separate investigations into her failed transport bid last month were released last week.

“It’s like a horror show and we’re the stars,” admitted Joe McGivern, father of brave transplant waiting list patient, Meadhbh McGivern after the findings of two separate investigations into her failed transport bid last month were released last week.

Joe was given copies of the HIQA report and the HSE internal report on the incident and the state of emergency transport for people requiring transplant surgery outside Ireland.

Speaking to the Leitrim Observer, Joe said that the family had been “dealt a very cruel blow” last month.

“We really thought that when we got the call that would be it and it would be a matter of just getting there and getting over to London.

“When everything fell apart we could not believe it and we were left with decision to go public and make sure this never happened again or to just stay quiet and wait for another call,” he acknowledged.

“We just felt that we needed answers and it is clear from both reports that this situation could have happened at any time. No one was in charge and no single body had the proper knowledge of the logistics required to carry out the transport of patients like Meadhbh. If this had been a life or death situation the results would have been devestating.”

The HIQA report concluded there was no organised or managed system or even any body with the necessary knowledge of the logistics required to carry out the transportation of Meadhbh.

The inquiry found that a key factor behind the failed transfer was that nobody was in charge despite the fact that a number of bodies were actually involved in the attempted airlift.

The health safety body HIQA, which carried out the main review of the case, said it was clear that the people involved in attempting to get the patient to London entered into desperate means to try to achieve this.

“However, this was in the absence of any organised or managed system or the required knowledge of logistics to adequately do so,” said HIQA CEO, Dr Tracey Cooper.

“The overriding finding that contributed to Meadhbh’s failed transportation was that no one person or agency was in charge or accountable for the overall process of care and transportation for Meadhbh.”

To read the full story see this week’s Leitrim Observer.