Student video aims to educate young people on farm safety

CBS Roscommon

Farming correspondent

Reporter:

Farming correspondent

An innovative farm safety video created by a group of agricultural science students in Co Roscommon  has attracted nearly 5,000 views since it was released on youtube.

The video is the work of students at CBS Roscommon which developed as a result of a project on farm safety.

During their study the students realised that there was very little education on farm safety in school and so they decided to create a video project to help educate young people about the risks and what they can do to stay safe on family farms.

The video has two main elements - the first of which focuses on a series of stories detailing the experience of victims of farm accidents and the impact on themselves and, in the story of one fatality, their family.

The hugely personal stories aim to bring home the importance of farm safety, giving 

The first story recounts the experience of 15-year-old CBS Roscommon student, James, who suffered a broken knee while handling sheep last Summer. The second story details how  Stephen, suffered serious injuries when he broke his neck in a farm accident aged just 18.

The final story in this segment is an interview with Matt English, whose son, Donal, died in a farm accident in Carlow, an incident which has changed the lives of his family and his local community, forever.

The second element of the video details a walk around a farm by Ella McSweeney and James Maloney. They highlight the hazards they encounter and give advice on how best to avoid them. 

As an added bonus for the pupils behind the short film, acclaimed Irish rugby player, Sean O'Brien, agreed to do the introduction and conclusion of the video and he also provided three farm safety tips and spoke about his near miss on the family farm as a result of slurry gases.

"We hope to create as much awareness as possible about the video to maximise the number of people who will view it, if it helped saved one limb or one life we feel it would have been a success," notes their agricultural science teacher, Louise Gallagher.