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Rooskey snow scene chosen for charity Christmas card

Rooskey Snow Scene of the River Shannon taken by Marie Mc Gowan, is one of four images chosen for the ILFA Christmas card Designs for 2012

Rooskey Snow Scene of the River Shannon taken by Marie Mc Gowan, is one of four images chosen for the ILFA Christmas card Designs for 2012

A stunning winter landscape photograph of the river Shannon at Rooskey, Co Roscommon has been chosen as one of four designs submitted from around Ireland for the Irish Lung Fibrosis Association’s (ILFA) annual Christmas card competition.

The photograph was taken close to Rooskey Bridge during the winter of 2010. The ILFA charity, now in its 10th year, was founded in 2002 to honour the memory of Fergus Goodbody who died from Lung Fibrosis. The ILFA was set up by Nicky Goodbody, Terence Moran, Marie Sheridan and Professor Jim Egan. The primary aims of the ILFA are to provide a source of information and support to people with the condition and to provide funding for research and the development of new treatments for Lung Fibrosis.

Idiopathic Lung Fibrosis, also known as Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis, is a progressive lung disease, of unknown origin, that causes scarring and hardening of the lungs and results in breathing difficulties for patients. Patients often require high dose oxygen therapy as they develop progressive difficulty with shortness of breath, coughing, and fatigue and these symptoms impact greatly on their quality of life, as they struggle with everyday tasks. Currently, there are no drug treatments to halt disease progression and the only successful intervention is lung transplantation.

The charity is based in Dublin with regional representatives in Cork, Kildare, Limerick and Leitrim and research is carried at the Mater Hospital in Dublin.

If you would like to support the ILFA, their Christmas cards are now on sale and can be ordered by phoning 086 0570310 or emailing info@ilfa.ie. For more information on the ILFA please visit www.ilfa.ie.

 

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